GSoC ’16 + ListenBrainz = fun :)

Hello,

I am Pinkesh Badjatiya and I have been working on ListenBrainz as part of GSoC ’16. I was largely involved in implementing the most requested features in ListenBrainz.
I began my journey with MetaBrainz not long before the Final Organization list was out. I started with MusicBrainz but moved quickly to ListenBrainz, and have been working on it since then.

About the project

The project consisted of creating a proxy scrobbling API similar to last.fm’s which could be used by existing desktop clients to submit listens to listenbrainz.org. I submitted my initial idea, that involved creating a new API along with few other optional features that were very much required (import, export, etc.).
The project made its way through the approval process, and I worked with ruaok (my mentor) & alastairp to get important things done. Yey!

Here are some of the snapshots of the my journey with ListenBrainz.

API_compat

ListenBrainz already had its own API which can be used to fetch/submit listens but all the existing clients that support scrobbling to last.fm use the ws.audioscrobbler.com’s API. To add support for these clients, I ended up creating a proxy API, api_compat (as in “compatible API”), that translates every request that is sent to “api.listenbrainz.org/2.0/” in the native format. This is an additional API which can be used along with the existing native ListenBrainz’s API.

This was largely the main goal of my project proposal. The instructions for scrobbling using Audacious are attached along with the source code.

Import lastfm-backup

The import page now allows users to import listens from the last.fm scrobbles or from the backup file which was downloaded from the older version of the last.fm website.
import_backup On successful import of listens from backup, you’ll get the following notification.import_success

Export listens

This allows users to export the listens from the listenbrainz.org website. This is useful for users who want to keep track of their listen history offline as well.
The export feature can be accessed from the drop-down menu.

export_dropdown_menuexport_page

Playing Now

With the support for API-Compat, the support for currently playing song was needed. This keeps the currently playing song on the website in sync with your favourite player.
playing_now

Import scraper uses audioscrobbler API

I also worked on updating the import scraper which now use the ws.audioscrobbler.com‘s API allowing users to import without opening their last.fm profiles. This also provides other useful track information to ListenBrainz.

Migrate to PostgreSQL

Another important change to ListenBrainz was how it stored listens. We moved from using Cassandra to PostgreSQL. Cassandra was fast and effective but getting more information other than the user’s listens (ex. generating statistics) was not possible. So we switched to Postgres + Redis. This opened more possibilities for future.

Experience

After 3.5 months, I ended up with 15 merged and 3 closed PR’s and a bunch of features for ListenBrainz that improved its look and feel.

My pull requests: https://github.com/metabrainz/listenbrainz-server/pulls?utf8=%E2%9C%93&q=is%3Apr%20author%3Apinkeshbadjatiya%20

I have worked on quite a lot of varied things in the past 4 months. A lot of them were actually not the part of the GSoC proposal but they were done largely in the same timeline or were optional targets, so I suppose they would count significantly towards GSoC.
I worked largely with alastairp, ruaok and Gentlecat. Gentlecat helped improve my coding style by providing feedback on my PR’s. I worked with alastairp and ruaok regarding the ideas/suggestions on how to address a problem and its possible solutions. It was a interesting experience working with the community and getting to know about MetaBrainz. Now that my understanding of the project and the community has increased, I look forward to making some great contributions!

Conclusion

In short, ListenBrainz went through a hell lot of changes in the past 4 months. If you were waiting for it to improve before using it, then now is the time that you should try it. I bet you’ll love its new look and you won’t be disappointed. 😀

Summer of Code ’16 with Picard

Hi! I’m Rahul Raturi, GSoC participant for Picard. This was my first GSoC, and it’s been a pretty awesome experience. Following is the overview of my project.

About the project

The outline of the project is to allow searching for albums, artists and tracks from within Picard. This avoids switching back and forth between web browser and Picard for searching, say release. If Picard fails to auto tag a file usual flow to tag the file with correct metadata is to first select the file, then click on “Lookup in Browser”, then search correct release, and load it into Picard by clicking the green “Tagger” button. In some systems, the “Tagger” button wouldn’t show, which was also a nuisance. With this patch, the entities can be searched and optionally loaded into Picard using built-in search dialogs, so no application switching.

Search dialogs

Picard already provides search options (through a web browser) for three entities; namely track, artist, and album. So I’ve built search dialogs for these three.

  1. Track Search Dialog — Searches for tracks and allows optionally loading corresponding album back into Picard. track_dialog
  2. Album Search Dialog — Searches albums and optionally allows loading the selected one into Picard. Screenshot from 2016-08-15 17-08-09
  3. Artist Search Dialog —  Displays basic information about the artists. To get more information about the selected artist, there’s an option to lookup him/her in browser. Screenshot from 2016-08-20 15-55-42

Searching similar tracks/releases

This is another important part of the project. Sometimes Picard fails to auto tag a file (or a cluster), or incorrectly tag it. These dialogs may prove useful here. To get expected data, right click on the file (should be in “Unmatched Files” cluster), and select “Search for similar tracks…”. The track search dialog would pop up, and expected release can be looked up there. Same procedure is for searching clusters.

Links to my work

Each PR is based on the previous one. A new dialog in each, plus some improvements to existing dialog. For trying the dialog, clone the artist search branch, until it gets merged into master. It has the most recent changes.

Note: To use these dialog for searching, an option in User Interface setting about built-in search needs to be enabled.

Conclusion

It was quite fun doing this project. Thanks to Michael Wiencek (mentor) for the guidance and leniency :). Also the Picard team for the reviews. I look forward to contribute more to Picard, now that I’ve a better understanding of the code. Also for another Summer of Code.

GSoC 2016 students and projects

Google announced the final list of Google Summer of Code 2016 students and their projects yesterday. The list of MetaBrainz’ projects can be seen at our page on the GSoC site, but just for good measure, here’s the rundown:

MusicBrainz
Jeff Weeks (weeksio) returns to finish up the SOLR search server. We’re really hoping that this will be the end of our current search server woes. He will be mentored by the German duo of Ulrich Klauer (chirlu) and Rob Kaye (ruaok).
MusicBrainz Picard
Rahul Raturi (rahulr) will be working on improving searching MusicBrainz from within Picard, mentored by MusicBrainz’ senior developer Michael Wiencek (bitmap).
BookBrainz
Max Prettyjohns (QuoraUK) is going to try and take on adding gamification to our fledgling book/literature database. He will be supervised by the BookBrainz project leads and lead developers Ben Ockmore (LordSputnik) and Sean Burke (Leftmost).
ListenBrainz
Pinkesh Badjatiya (armalcolite) has pledged to tackle adding a much requested feature for our youngest project: implementing a Last.FM compatible submission API. Robert Kaye (ruaok) will be the one guiding him along.
AcousticBrainz
Daniele Scarano (hellska) will be spending the summer writing a toolkit for creating datasets, which should help researchers using AcousticBrainz. He will be mentored by MetaBrainz software engineer Roman Tsukanov (Gentlecat).
Kartik Gupta (kartikgupta0909) has set out to create an offline client for computing AcousticBrainz dataset evaluations. Alastair Porter (alastairp), the AcousticBrainz project lead, will be their mentor.
Goran Cetusic (cetko), our final student of this year, will be exploring how AcousticBrainz data can be utilised within Google’s BigQuery storage under the guidance of Alastair Porter.

Congratulations and good luck to all our students! We’re looking forwards to following your progress over the summer and see what you end up with. 🙂

For all the students that applied but did not get accepted: we appreciate your applications, and even if you did not make the cut this year, we hope that you will stick around and apply with us again next year when we know you better – and you know us better.

For now, let the community bonding… begin! 🙌

Roman Tsukanov joins the MetaBrainz team

I’m pleased to announce that last week we officially hired Roman Tsukanov, AKA Gentlecat to be a part time developer for MusicBrainz!

Gentlecat has already established himself firmly in our community: Last year he rocked the CritiqueBrainz project for Summer of Code and this summer he rocked AcousticBrainz. And he’s written our shiny new MetaBrainz web site! He is now in the process of learning perl and has started to help Bitmap review existing code reviews. And he has even fixed a couple of issues already. In other words he lives up to his name: To Gentlecat something means to rock it!

I’m quite happy to have such a capable developer participating in MusicBrainz. Welcome to the team Gentlecat!