Mobile Apps: Let’s welcome the ListenBrainz App!

Greetings, Everyone!

During the recent summit, we discussed the future of our mobile apps. We believe that the MusicBrainz app serves a particular user base which is highly interested in scrolling through their collections, using the barcode scanner, searching for entities and viewing this data with a native mobile experience. The tagger in the android app is not accurate and doesn’t carry forward the expectations brought in from using Picard on the Desktop. Hence, we have decided to retire the tagger from the MusicBrainz app.

Recently, we have added the BrainzPlayer to the app, Spotify support and functionalities to review and submit listens to ListenBrainz. While the features are really good, they don’t align with the MusicBrainz app and confuse the two separate user bases, that of MusicBrainz and ListenBrainz.

Given that we have limited contributors working on our mobile apps, we have decided to separate the two mobile apps with their respective features. MusicBrainz App will be stripped of these excessive features, while also removing the tagger and continue to be available on the Play store as a minimalistic app.

Our major focus will move to the ListenBrainz app which will continue to have regular updates and features made while existing on the Play store as a separate app.

We are excited and happy with this announcement. Hope you agree with our decision. Thank you!

Making ticket votes public

The MetaBrainz ticket tracker (which, incidentally, received a long-needed upgrade recently – thanks, Gentlecat!) is an important tool for all of our projects. It collects all kinds of bug reports, feature requests and other tasks to be done and makes sure none are forgotten.

One of its auxiliary features is the possibility for users to vote for a ticket, to indicate which tickets they consider particularly important. (There are only upvotes; you can’t vote against a ticket.) This may factor in when MetaBrainz employees decide on which tickets to tackle next, although there are other factors as well such as the complexity and the impact of a particular issue.

In the past, who voted for which tickets has been private, mostly because that is the default setting in JIRA, the ticket tracker software used. Only administrators can see the list of voters for a ticket; regular users just see the number of votes.

Now, we have decided to change that: In the future, all logged-in users will be able to see who voted for a ticket. This should not be sensitive information; whoever expressed their support for a ticket by commenting on it instead of (or in addition to) voting already was in the public eye. Still, it is a policy change. We’ve therefore decided to wait two weeks before implementing the new privileges, in order to give everybody the chance to remove any votes that they don’t want to be known with. The ticket tracker provides a list of all tickets that you have voted for.